5 Ways to Make a Home Welcoming for Foster or Adoptive Children

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How exciting and scary this Chapter 3 of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling begins! Harry is being rescued from his imprisonment in the Dursley house by the Weasley boys who are driving a flying car. They just narrowly escape Uncle Vernon’s grasp to whisk Harry away with all his school stuff to go stay at their house. This is Harry’s first time visiting the Weasley home, and while the rest of the wizarding world and even the Weasley’s themselves think pretty lowly of the house, to Harry it’s wonderful. Matter of fact, he declares that it’s the best house that he’s ever been in.

What made the house so special to Harry? It’s magical, and it’s welcoming and homey, things which he could never feel about the Dursley’s home, even though they did alright financially. The kitchen was stacked with magical cookbooks and clocks that told what tasks needed done at the time, and the best part was that he was able to sit down and eat WITH the family and wasn’t required to do the cooking for them. He thought the garden was just the way it should be. Ron’s room was completely decorated in memorabilia of his favorite Quidditch team: the Chudley Cannons.

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This brings me to the question of how do we make a child feel welcome in our home.

  1. A Space of Their Own
    Children need a little space to claim as their own. Poor Harry was finally given a decent space in the Dursleys home (out of their fear, not love), but it was really Dudley’s extra playroom. I read a comment this morning on Facebook from an adoptive family who welcomed a foster child for adoption. The child got to pick out furniture at a store and remarked about how it was to be the first time their bed hadn’t been slept in by others first. Granted, not every family can go out and get new furniture for a child, but a little space (bed, closet space, some drawers, maybe a desk and a chill out and get away from everyone else to calm down space) for them to be only theirs goes a long way to making a child feel special and cared for and not discarded.
  2. Felt Safety
    Felt safety is a term used by Drs. Purvis and Cross in their life-changing book The Connected Child. (Note: This topic is so important that they make “Chapter 4: Disarming the Fear Response with Felt Safety” available online for free. I highly recommend reading this chapter when you can.) What is “felt safety?”

    “You can take an important step toward eliminating tantrums and misbehaviors – and enabling learning and positive family relationships – by providing an atmosphere where children feel and experience safety for themselves. We like to describe this strategy as providing “felt safety.” This means that adults arrange the environment and adjust their behavior so children can feel in a profound and basic way that they are truly safe in their home and with us. Until a child experiences safety for his or herself, trust can’t develop, and healing and learning won’t progress. We offer “felt safety” so healing may begin.”

    As adults, we know a child is safe in our home. However, they don’t feel safe. There are things we did frequently in the beginning with our kids. We had food readily accessible and just required that they ask first to help with food issues. We took them with us to lock doors and windows and test them. We had a huge felt safety win the other day. Two of our kiddos are extremely hypervigilant and fearful about going to sleep. One had been expressing some more increased fear lately and kept going around the house in the middle of the night turning all the lights on just to cross the hall to the bathroom. We picked up a new night light for the child’s bedroom (a cool one with 2 LED images of a butterfly that interchange). The hugs and excitement that followed me plugging it in were nothing compared to the comment I heard from the hallway as I looked back and saw the child sitting Indian style in front of the light admiring it. “I told you and Dad I was scared of the dark, and you got me this!” I declare that a win!

    Butterfly night light felt safety

  3. Evidence That the Child Lives in the Home
    Visitors to the home of the Dursleys would never see any evidence that Harry existed. There were no pictures on the walls, framed drawings, or anything else to show he was a part of their family. I have heard from many former foster youth that they desperately wanted feel they belonged, but it was hard surrounded by the biological family’s belongings and pictures. A snapshot or school photo of the child in a frame on the mantle or a picture of them with your family by their bedside gives them a sense of belonging that can greatly impact them. Dalton went gaga over a picture of himself with Darren’s dad that we framed and put in his room. He still treasures it years later. Early on in her time in our home, Jasmine made a chalk drawing of an apple at school that all the teachers, staff, and parents just loved and were quick to tell us about when we visited the school. It was framed and put up in our living room as soon as they stopped displaying it at the school. It hangs in the kitchen of our new home.chalk apple by Jasmine
  4. Personalization
    There are small, inexpensive ways to make personalizations for your home for a temporary placement, and more expensive ways to make them at home once you know they’re there to stay. I picked up inexpensive wooden letters with the kids initials to hang over their towels in the bathroom. My in-laws picked them up inexpensive room signs with their names. Jasmine picked out Spongebob sheets and curtains for a long while. It was a say to make the room hers without permanently changing things that another placement may not like.
    Making a Foster Child Welcome Welcoming a Child for AdoptionNow that the kiddos are adopted, and we’ve settled in the home we plan to be in hopefully for a few years (after a layoff and 2 moves), we wanted to start REALLY making their rooms personalized to them. Our older two boys both tested into Gryffindor on www.pottermore.com, so they’re getting a Gryffindor room. Jasmine will be displaying her loyalty in her new Hufflepuff room, and Dalton will proudly represent his house of clever Ravenclaws with his room. (Pictures will come in future blogs I’m sure!)

    DIY Gryffindor Bedroom

    DIY Gryffindor Bedroom-It’s not finished yet. It’s going to have curtains on the beds when it’s complete, and we’ll likely do a whole DIY blog on it.

  5. Activities Done Together in the Home
    There are lots of activities that you can do with your kiddos in your home to make them feel like it is their home, too. Here are a couple of the things we did. Not long after all our children moved in, we planted what we coined our “family tree.” It was little more than a twig at the time, and as a family, we took turns watering and caring for our little tree, making sure it had stability and all it needed (as we do for our kids!). Over the years, it is becoming a really pretty dwarf Japanese maple. Below you can see how it had grown in the couple years before we moved out of state in 2012.
    illinois-home-transfiguring-adoption-outside

    Another way to make a child feel like they belong in a household is by including them in home improvement projects. This may be done with simple projects like putting together new furniture for their room or bigger remodeling or painting projects. We had gutted and remodeled most of our Illinois home before our kiddos moved in. However, the early 1900s kitchen was “eclectic” with some 1950s (metal cabinets with porcelain drain board and sink) and 1970s updates (drop ceilings and white and lime green paneling) intact. The kids had a blast helping me do the demolition work when I could no longer tolerate trying to feed a family of 6 in the outdated and not well utilized space. Sledgehammers are really fun! 😉 Of course, safety and age appropriateness of a project must always be considered first. 
DIY Harry Potter bedroom loft building

Matthew helping dad with our DIY loft bed for his Gryffindor bedroom

 

Discussion Questions:

What have you noticed made a child feel more at ease in your home?

What have you done in your home to welcome new kiddos?

How have you made kids feel safe?

Reach Your Kiddos On Their Level About This Topic

An excellent children’s book about this topic is Wanting to Belong by Adam Robe.

Wanting to Belong Robbie Reader

Wanting to Belong Robbie Reader

 

 

Parent Discussions: 

Ch. 01 | Ch. 02 | Ch. 03 | Ch. 04

Kids’ Discussions:

Ch. 01 | Ch. 02 | Ch. 03 | Ch. 04 | Ch. 05 | Ch. 06 | Ch. 07 | Ch. 08 | Ch. 09 | Ch. 10 | Ch. 11 | Ch. 12

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