The Kid-Friendly ADHD & Autism Cookbook – Parent Review

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From the Cover of The Kid-Friendly ADHD & Autism Cookbook: The Ultimate Guide to the Gluten-free, Casein-free Diet by Pamela Compart and Dana Laake:

“Simple, delicious, and fun recipes that battle symptoms related to ADHD and autism

This special diet has become an essential step of treatment for families struggling with autism and ADHD. And these recipes for gluten- and casein- free foods, meals, and snacks are simple to prepare and yummy—making it easier than ever to please kids who have behavioral or developmental challenges, or are just picky eaters.

In this revised and updated edition, we’ve compiled all the latest research findings and added more information on other food culprits. We’ve also added 100 new recipes! So, in addition to all of the great recipes you discovered in the first edition [ . . . ]

[ . . . ] you’ll find brand new recipes destined to become family favorites [ . . . ]

The Kid-Friendly ADHD and Autism Cookbook tackles all of your concerns and serves as a how-to guide for beginning and maintaining a healthier diet that can improve your child’s brain function.

You will learn:

  • How food sensitivities differ from food allergies
  • How to avoid unsuspected sources of gluten, casein, soy, corn, and nuts
  • Ways to “disguise” healthy foods and get rid of junk food
  • What to do about the very picky eater
  • Many substitutes, substitutes, and more substitutes!

If you’ve ever thought that providing your kids with nutritious and delicious gluten- and casein-free meals is too much for you to handle—it isn’t. It’s easier than you think, and it can actually be made to be fun for you and your child. This book shows you how.

Grade:

5 hoots out of 5

Transfiguring Adoption awarded this book 5 Hoots out of 5 based on how useful it will be for a foster/adoptive family. [Learn more about our Hoot grading system here]

What Our Family Thought:

The target audience is parents of children with ADHD or autism—which is a large percentage of children placed in a family through foster care or adoption, parents of children with food allergies or sensitivities, and parents who simply have an interest in feeding their children a healthy diet and taking out ingredients that may be detrimental to their functioning. While the title concentrates on being a gluten and dairy free cookbook, the book actually talks about several different foods, the reactions that may be caused by them, and how to avoid them.

This cookbook contains over 300 recipes and an index at the end of the book which makes finding recipes with certain ingredients easy. Each recipe pictorially shows which of the six biggest allergens (gluten, milk, soy, egg, corn, or nuts) are contained or not contained within the recipe. The recipes are grouped in chapters by type (i.e., main dishes and one-dish meals, vegetables and side dishes, soups and stews, and so on), and recipes that are “quick n easy” are denoted so with a picture of a clock above the recipe. Servings yielded and nutritional information are included as well with each recipe.

The Kid-Friendly ADHD and Autism Cookbook is far more than a cookbook, though, as the book begins with almost 100 pages of information and education on food allergies and sensitivities, common reactions and responses to different ingredients, nutrition, substitutes, how-to’s, elimination diets, suggestions for dealing with family, friends, and school, and so much more. The entire book is also interspersed with testimonials of parents who have seen success with dietary interventions.

There is not a recipe in this cookbook (and we’ve tried the majority of them) that our kids would not eat, and they have loved most that we tried with only a few not being repeatedly fixed in our home. As a matter of fact, our kids request recipes fromThe Kid-Friendly ADHD and Autism Cookbook every year for their birthday dinners and other special events. Our copy is well-worn and bears evidence of sitting on our counter for several years as I’ve cooked recipes out of it. Even though we are not currently eating gluten and dairy free for financial reasons (and also because certain kids were cheating so much away from home that it wasn’t really working), we still fix recipes from this cookbook frequently. I recommend this cookbook to others all the time, and they overwhelmingly love it!

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It’s Your Turn:

  1. What did you learn about food reactions that stood out to you?
  2. What recipes did your children love? Some of our favorites are the roasted apple chicken, easy chicken, Spanish chicken, fish pockets, Vietnamese spring rolls, carrot soufflé, and lemon pudding. The peanut butter truffle cookies are a frequent request by my family and friends, and I usually quadruple the recipe and keep a supply in our freezer.
  3. What recipes were your children not so wild about?

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