Caring with Vitality – Foster Care and Adoption Book Review

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From the Cover of Caring with Vitality – Yoga and Wellbeing for Foster Carers, Adopters and Their Families: Everyday Ideas to Help You Cope and Thrive! by Andrea Warman and Liz Lark:

“Realize the benefits that yoga and related mind/body approaches can unlock for you and your family. This book presents tried-and-tested strategies to help improve your life — from encouraging a calm household and improving sleep to simply finding some personal space. It describes easy-to-follow mindfulness exercises and yoga poses to suit your needs, whether you are looking for energy and strength or relaxation and calm. The authors, experts in adoption and fostering, yoga and nutrition, share healthy tips, ideas and recipes — many coming from carers. They also reveal how, through shared confidence-building activities like cooking and gardening, families can not only enjoy spending relaxing time together but help children to develop the skills they need for a healthy future.

Caring With Vitality is an inspiring, practical, accessible read for foster and adoptive families, and can also be used by agencies and related professionals providing support for parents or carers.”

Grade:

5 hoots out of 5

Transfiguring Adoption awarded this book 4 Hoots out of 5 based on how useful it will be for a foster/adoptive family. [Learn more about our Hoot grading system here]

What Our Family Thought:

The target audience for this book is foster and adoptive parents and the agencies that license and support them. It is packed with ideas for caregivers to practice self care and talks about the added importance of these practices for foster and adoptive parents compared to the general public.

As with any self-care practices, actually implementing the ideas are most important. I have read the book but haven’t begun using the ideas yet, other than one evening of doing a couple of the calming yoga poses with our youngest child and making one of the recipes. Thus far I can say that my son and I really enjoyed the yoga (He’s asking to do it again!), and the recipe I made was very tasty. I’d say the difficulty in beginning to use the ideas lies in taking the time to learn the moves, which is not particularly easy when you’re first starting and attempting to read the directions and complete the moves at the same time. Plus, there are so many ideas that I need to take some time to determine how to start.

The practices in the book were actually implemented as a program for caregivers (and some for family members as well) by a foster care agency in Teynham, England, over a period of several weeks. The program was used as a different way to support caregivers and yielded very positive results. Ideas, tips, and stories from these caregivers are included in the book.

I definitely think this book would present foster care agencies with several ideas for working with caregivers in an effort to retain them and help them feel well supported. It would be a great jumping off point for pilot programs to be run in other locations. I also recommend it to caregivers and believe, given a little time to learn the practices taught in the book, families could find relaxation, rejuvenation, and bonding happening through the ideas in this book.

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